Funny Video

by 30. October 2013 16:57

Here's a funny video By Freddie W. featuring Key and Peele.  

 

 

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Larry Vickers at Gun Gallery 8/30

by Neil 22. August 2013 15:07

Come meet Larry, August 30th from 2pm to 7pm at the Gun Gallery. While Larry is here, we will be having a sale on BCM Guns and AR15 Upper Receivers, as well as Blue Force Gear Vickers Slings.

Larry Vickers of Vickers Tactical in a retired US Army 1st SFOD-Delta combat veteran with years of experience in the firearms industry as a combat marksmanship instructor and industry consultant. In recent years he has hosted tactical firearms related TV shows on the Sportsman Channel with the latest being TacTV of which Bravo Company is a presenting sponsor. Larry Vickers special operations background is one of the most unique in the industry today; he has been directly or indirectly involved in the some of the most significant special operations missions of the last quarter century. In addition he was directly involved in the design and development of the HK416 for Tier One SOF use. Larry Vickers has developed various small arms accessories with the most notable being his signature sling manufactured by Blue Force Gear and Glock accessories made by Tangodown. Larry Vickers travels the country conducting combat marksmanship classes for law abiding civilians, law enforcement and military and has partnered with Alias Training to coordinate classes to best meet the needs of the students attending the class.

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Double Header Weekend.

by 15. July 2013 13:49

6-29-13 and 6-30-13 I had two matches to go to in the same weekend. The first one was in Fernandina Florida at the range where the monthly SEPSA match is held. We had a fair turnout however the early morning rain drove off a few people. After the rain stopped, it was dry the whole time we shot. There were some really good shooters out there and it was a fun day. The courses were a little more free form than we do at most of the USCA matches out there. There were a lot of challenges that some of the shooters there weren't used to IE having to put the rifle in the left shoulder to be able to get around a barricade. I was pretty happy with how I shot the Texas star but there were a few places were I lost a fair amount of time.

6-30-13 was FDCC which is a little more my style. The scores show me in 6th place but one of my scores was put in incorrectly and I should be in 2nd. It started POURING! and the second course of fire it was tough to see some of the targets. Fun day though.

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The Four Safety Rules

by 11. July 2013 16:56

Universal Safety Rules

Sometimes referred to as the Four Safety Rules of Firearms handling. These safety rules should be memorized and in the back of your head every time you handle a firearm. When people dismiss these rules, and start to think that it’s ok to break them, is often when you start to see people get hurt. I hope that some people will read this and become better educated on what the rules are and how to apply them. These aren’t “Range Rules” They are “24/7 rest of your gun owning life rules”

The First Safety Rule “All guns are ALWAYS loaded”
If you are handling a gun you should treat it like a loaded gun, even if it is not. If you see a gun and pick it up you should assume it is loaded. Even if you unloaded the gun, and put it in your safe, that only you have access to, when you pick it up you should just assume that somehow the ND fairy snuck in and loaded your gun. The main excuse I hear when people break the safety rules is “Well it’s not loaded.” This rule is arguably the most important. People often know not break the other rules, however treating a gun like it’s some sort of inert paper weight is what get’s people in trouble, and causes them to break the other rules.

The Second Safety Rule “Never point a weapon at ANYTHING you do not intend to shoot.”
I see people break this rule all the time. The number one excuse is that “Well it isn’t loaded.” See the first rule. It’s really pretty simple. Do not point the muzzle of the firearm at anyone that you don’t intend to shoot EVER. Make sure you take the time to avoid crossing your barrel over things you wouldn’t want to shoot. I often see very negligent muzzle discipline which has been the result of a few incidents of it’s own.

The Third Safety Rule “Keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to fire.” And if your firearm has a manual Safety “Keep the weapon on Safe until you intend to fire.”
Some people separate these rules but I’ve lumped them together. Your finger should not be on the trigger or even in the trigger guard until you have your sights on target and you are about to shoot. Too often I see people put their finger on the trigger when the muzzle is pointed nowhere near the target. This has accounted for many holes in our range that shouldn’t be there.
Part 2 If you have a manual safety it should be on until you have made the decision to shoot and the firearm is pointed in the general direction of the target. IE I draw the gun from the holster once it has cleared my body parts and I’m bringing the gun up to my eyes and I think it’s pointed in the direction of the target I will flip the safety off. When I am done engaging that target and have no more targets in the immediate area to shoot at I will then re-engage the safety. This would be before moving or holstering a handgun. Too many people try to use a manual safety as a crutch. It’s not there to stop you from pulling the trigger. Manual safeties are designed to stop the gun from going off if you drop it or if something brushes the trigger from the side. You are not safe from a Negligent Discharge (ND) just because you have a safety. Even with the safety on all 4 Safety rules still apply.

The fourth safety rule “Know your target and its foreground and background”
Knowing your target means you need positive identification of what you are shooting at. If it’s dark you shouldn’t shoot at a moving silhouette unless you have already confirmed it is a threat to you. Shooting at movement or bushes etc. is a good way to shoot someone that is just in the wrong place at the wrong time and doesn’t mean you harm. There are many stories of people shooting someone that they thought was an intruder and it turned out to be someone that came home at a time the home owner didn’t expect. Knowing your targets background means having an idea of where the bullet would go if it were to strike your intended target and go through. There is always the risk of the bullet doing some crazy ricochet that you can’t account for, however you should have already thought out things like “If I shoot in this direction will it go into my kids room.” Knowing your background or “backstop” is important. Knowing your targets foreground means many things. For a rifle this includes knowing height over bore. You need to pay attention to people that may be caught between you and the target and objects that you may not see while simply looking down the sights. On an open range this is a very important rule as well, I have seen people walking down to pick up targets and someone behind the line decides to pick up a gun and start shooting.

There are many examples of firearms negligence readily available on the internet. Don’t be those people. Always do your best to safely handle a firearm. It only takes one momentary lapse in judgement to change your life and the lives of others forever. It’s your duty as a responsible firearms owner to know these rules, and how to practically apply them, EVERY time you come in contact with a firearm. Do not be so arrogant to think “I would never do any of that” because there are many long time gun owners who have. Complacency kills.
Here’s some examples of things I am talking about.

Article on ND's

Website with several ND stories.

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Universal Shooting Academy 3 Gun Frostproof, FL

by 24. June 2013 18:46

Friday (6-21-13) I was invited down by a some friends of mine, Jay Shartzer and Jay Shartzer II to share in a private class with Frank Garcia. Naturally I jumped at the chance. Frank Garcia has a long list of accomplishments Including IPSC World Champion, IPSC National Champion, as well as training special operations groups in both the Navy Seal communities and Special Forces communities. Shooting with him can be truly humbling. He's smooth, consistent, and fast. Exactly what you would expect from a world class shooter. The shooting consisted of a lot of dot drills and shooting moving targets. Seeing the sights and knowing how and when to pull the trigger a certain way were his main concerns.

Jay, Jay, and I were invited to stay for the 3 gun match the next day. I shot ok but I was unfamiliar with the shotgun It was an FN SLP and I don't spend a ton of time shooting shotgun so I kind of took my time with it.  All 5 Stages involved the shotgun in some way, 3 involved the rifle, and 2 involved the pistol.  So my weakest link was on every stage.  The stages were challenging and fun.  There weren't a ton of competitors but there were some very good shooters out there.

Stage 1 involved shooting a steel popper with the shotgun that activated two clay pigeons.  After that you dumped the shotgun and had two make one hit on each steel with your feet on the ground and one hit on each steel from on top of a platform.  The Steel targets were around 210, 270, and 385 yards (IIRC) Which was a bit difficult to shoot with a red dot optic.  I made my hits but it took me forever to shoot from the ground.  Once I made it to the Platform I did ok.

Stage 2 started with the shotgun shooting steel plates and then transitioning to handgun and cleaning up any steel and taking down the paper targets.  Fairly simple stage.

Stage 3 Was shotgun only.  There was a platform shaped like a big V.  At the bottom of the v is where you had to start with your feet on in front of the other because of how narrow it was.  There were wooden slats that you could put your feet on and a wall directly in front of you causing you to have to lean over pretty far to get some of the shots.  It was an interesting stage and I should have trusted myself to make all my hits but I instead loaded the magzine tube with bird shot and did a bolt lock reload.  My shell didn't fall in there properly and I lost a bit of time fixing it.  

Stage 4 quick and simple.  this one required shooting the same thing three times and taking the best 2 out of 3 times for score.  Take down one plate with the shotgun then transition to rifle and get one hit on each steel.

Stage 5 was probably the most fun for me.  There were rifle only targets, pistol only targets, and shotgun only targets and navigating the stage properly involved a bit of forethought.  I did decent on this stage.  

Overall I placed 9th of 19  However spots 3 and 6 were held by Frank Garcia and Shannon Smith both are GM shooters.  I'd say with the field of competitors there, I did ok.  

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NFDCC 6-9-13

by 19. June 2013 13:41

NFDCC 6-9-13 Gainesville Target Range 1610 NW 65th Place Gainesville, FL 32653.  I didn't shoot my best, and it was HOT outside, but I had fun while I was there.  I came in 3rd place despite having some pretty bad mess ups. I also opted to wear my plate carrier with plates and full kit this month.  Hopefully next month I'll shoot better.

Stage 1 is where I promptly took myself out of the running for first.  Since you had to shoot on the move in between the boxes it was difficult to make the headshot and avoid the no shoots.  I shot over the heads of those targets gaining me four misses. Despite having the fastest raw time each miss is a 5 second penalty and I got an FTN for each which is another 5.  If it weren't for that I would have won, but you know, woulda coulda shoulda.  

Stage 2 was the team stage.  This time I held us up a bit with my handgun shooting.  But after that we both made our hits in a timely fashion.

Stage 3 I messed up on this stage and didn't realize it until I was almost finished.  I ran into the house shooting body shots and only at the end realized I was supposed to be making head shots.  The part of the target below the head should have been painted black.  

Stage 4 I did ok on.  I missed my first shot left handed and then shot the target too many times causing me to have to reload before I wanted to.  Other than that I did pretty good.

 

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NFDCC 6-9-13

by 19. June 2013 13:41

NFDCC 6-9-13 Gainesville Target Range 1610 NW 65th Place Gainesville, FL 32653.  I didn't shoot my best, and it was HOT outside, but I had fun while I was there.  I came in 3rd place despite having some pretty bad mess ups. I also opted to wear my plate carrier with plates and full kit this month.  Hopefully next month I'll shoot better.

Stage 1 is where I promptly took myself out of the running for first.  Since you had to shoot on the move in between the boxes it was difficult to make the headshot and avoid the no shoots.  I shot over the heads of those targets gaining me four misses. Despite having the fastest raw time each miss is a 5 second penalty and I got an FTN for each which is another 5.  If it weren't for that I would have won, but you know, woulda coulda shoulda.  

Stage 2 was the team stage.  This time I held us up a bit with my handgun shooting.  But after that we both made our hits in a timely fashion.

Stage 3 I messed up on this stage and didn't realize it until I was almost finished.  I ran into the house shooting body shots and only at the end realized I was supposed to be making head shots.  The part of the target below the head should have been painted black.  

Stage 4 I did ok on.  I missed my first shot left handed and then shot the target too many times causing me to have to reload before I wanted to.  Other than that I did pretty good.

 

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Dry Fire, Airsoft, .22 conversions for training

by 3. June 2013 15:00

To be good at shooting you must practice.  Really, to be good at just about anything, you must practice.  Most people do not have the time or the money to go to the range everyday and shoot.  Even some of the worlds top professionals don't have that much time or ammo.  So what are your alternatives?  

Dry fire is the least expensive and easiest way to practice.  You can practice your draw, transitions, reloads, Etc.  Dry fire is a great way to build your subconcious neural pathways, what some people mistakenly call "Muscle Memory".  A proper trigger pull is essential to becoming a good shooter, especially when shooting with a handgun.  Dry fire allows you to get thousands of repitions with a proper trigger pull and since there is no recoil you can watch the front sight to make sure that the gun is not moving improperly as you pull the trigger.

Airsoft can give you a little more feedback, in that with some models you can feel a slight bit of recoil, and you can't cheat it on the shots. 

.22 conversions will be the closest to the real thing and you will get the added bennefit of something that acts almost exactly like the real thing with a slightly lighter recoil and you'll probably spend some time clearing malfunctions so you can be profficient with those.

Whatever you do if you want to get better all of these are training methods that will help you save time and money.  Nothing completely replaces the real thing so you should still get out and practice once in awhile with the real thing.  But you will surely up your game by practicing more.  Here are some videos to give you some ideas.

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Squib Load

by 30. May 2013 16:47

Reloading is a great way to save money and/or have very precise loads.  People load for many different reasons some to save money, some to get the best accuracy they can, some to have a little less recoil.  With the recent demand for ammo more and more people have started to reload.  While this is great it can also be a very hazardous undertaking.  We've seen a few guns ruined by either someones own reloads or someone else's.  Generally factory reloads are pretty safe but I generally don't shoot my buddies reloads nor would I generally offer reloads to someone else because of the seriousness of what can happen.  Just the other day we saw a gentleman come in the store who shot his friends reloads and on the first round it did quite a bit of damage to the gun.  Ruining the bolt and possibly doing damage to the chamber.  Here's an article by Kyle Defoor on the subject.  

Kyle's Blog post on Squib loads.

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FDCC 5-26-13

by 30. May 2013 12:52

All this shooting has seriously depleted my ammo! But I wouldn't miss it for anything. For sure my favorite thing to do is go out and compete and have fun shooting. This month we didn't anchor RO's and so I had a chance to rotate around with a group of shooters and not spend the whole day working and then run to a bay to try to get some shooting in. This of course may have lead to some inconsistencies but "Cést La Vie" I had more fun. We shot 6 stages that were short but challenging. I didn't have any Major screw ups just a few small ones and finished pretty strong with 2nd place.  

USCA Sanctioned FDCC match Results.

The first stage we shot was Stage 6 "Long Range". I shot this one Fairly fast. I dropped one in the C zone on the target obscured by the No-Shoot. I wish I hadn't but it was close to that No shoot. I went one for one on the steel though which is good. I got first on this stage.

Stage 1 "A Texas Star is Born" was next. Opening the locker doors was enough to make you fumble a bit and I had a bit of problem with the middle head plate steel. I should have taken more time on the first shot and not have gotten too caught up in trying to get it done fast. 

Stage 2 "Rifle Run" I did pretty decent on.  Pretty simple stage layout.  

Stage 3 "Pipe and Plate Rack I did well on.  I only had one C zone hit and got first place.  I didn't get my run recorded on this one.

Stage 4 "The Grid" I did ok but I let myself get distracted a few times instead of trusting that I had already taken some of the paper targets and kept double checking myself.  For anyone confused about this stage you were required to not expose yourself to more than one array of targets at a time.  Which added to the complexity of this stage.

Stage 5 "Around the Corner" I had to shoot three times because we were having issues with the steel droppers.  I had a decent time on this and maybe could have shot it better but I'm ok with it.

 

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